4/8/2020 – Bargaining is live tonight at 5pm, District wide FAQs & Upcoming MOU

Bargaining tonight – starting at 5:00 pm

Join your bargaining team and Bargaining Organizing Action Team (The JCEA BOAT) on April 8th for our first virtual bargaining session. You can tune in from the comfort of your couch in your Pjs. In addition to bargaining over salary your team is focused on increasing teacher rights and restoring a fair and transparent grievance process to our Union contract – which strengthens every single word of the current contract and everything negotiated in the future.

It only takes two easy steps to join us –

1. Like the JCEA BOAT Facebook page – JCEA Bargaining & Organizing Action Team

2. Sign up for the April 8th Bargaining live feed session and join us from home – April 8th Bargaining Session

Upcoming MOU – Draft coming soon

As the COVID crisis has rapidly changed all of our lives and the landscape of learning we have been working hard on continuing to advocate for educators and students as we redefine our daily work. Through our online google form ( http://bit.ly/JCEA_Questions2020 ) member surveys and one on one conversations with JCEA members from across the district our elected board and bargaining team members have been working with staff on a draft MOU to continue to define expectations, professional practices and centering self-care for educators moving forward.

This draft MOU will be shared with all of our members soon , and we very much appreciate your honest feedback and continued work to help each other through this challenging time. We expect that some of our suggestions will be easy to make, and others may be faced with push back from district leadership.

We believe we have captured our members top concerns and goals, and we will need as many members engaged in the process as possible. Please keep an eye on your emails about the MOU moving forward.

District wide FAQs

Continued answers to questions submitted through the JCEA online google form

District Responses to differing expectations in different buildings

Question: How should I hold students accountable for their assignments during online learning when internet access is not an issue? At present I have assignments that have been completed by less than 30% of the students. Should we just accept what we get? What admin support will there be with families?

Answer: More specific guidance is forthcoming on grading practices for the rest of this year, but generally staff should assign and grade work in accordance with their professional judgement and existing school/district practices on grading just as they would for an in-person class.

Students failing to complete the assignments should be notified and their grades adjusted accordingly. Learning and accountability for tasks assigned is not on pause. If there is an internet or access issue, then we should problem solve with the student to get them access and afford them time and support to get caught up.

Question: What times teachers should available to students on line and how much time students should spend actively on line. Teachers with their own children at home are especially concerned about this.

Answer: Teachers and staff at buildings may choose synchronous or asynchronous instructional models, or some combination. The decision about scheduling is based on the school building, we would recommend communicating with administration in your building (s) about expectations.

Question: I was able to attend training virtually today and heard that we should not expect students to adhere to a time schedule yet our teachers were asked to create schedules accounting for the whole day.

Answer: It is possible for teachers to design and provide an instructional day consisting of resources, readings, videos, recorded direct instruction, tasks, and assessments that account for a full instructional day. Students may or may not complete that during a typical 8-3 school day. One of the challenges on which teachers will need to evaluate, self-reflect, and adjust is around the amount or level of work they are giving students and if this is appropriate in a remote learning situation.

Question: Documenting time-some teachers are being asked to document time working in multiple ways. This seems a waste of time and energy when people are already stressed.

Answer: The district is not asking people to document time working. The district is asking our professionals to engage with their students and design meaningful learning experiences that keep them moving toward meeting the standards and expectations for different disciplines. If you feel your building is doing something unreasonable, contact your community superintendent to evaluate the plan at your school.

Question: What are the expectations for other meetings: staff meetings, PLCs, etc.

Answer: Staff are expected to engage in virtual staff meetings, other meetings, PLCs. Some staff members need this support – others may not. Staff should collaborate with building leaders on what supports are useful or necessary. Mondays can be used for this purpose, in part.

Question: Some high school teachers are expecting things to be due during their normal class period. This doesn’t allow time for kids to ask clarifying questions if they don’t understand the directions. There should be at least 24-48 hour period before something is due. This take into account tech issues, jobs. Family obligations.

Answer: This is a synchronous mindset, which is an option. However, synchronous approaches are difficult to adhere to in completely remote environments. We suggest that teachers using completely synchronous approaches to consider the possibility that they may hold class and assign tasks, but that students may have other questions or turn in work at a later time – a more asynchronous approach.

Question: On the Elementary level – one school was told only math writing and reading. No longer than 30 minutes of homework. But I see science and multiple sheets for kids to complete. As a parent you would feel like you need to complete all that the teacher is posting, but the really only should be posting 3 things a day. If not, there needs to be clarification on that.

Answer: Some schools have started with math, reading, and writing. However, we are now delivering remote learning for the remainder of the year. We should try our best to provide instruction in all disciplines going forward. Teachers should collaborate with DLTs, AMP teachers, and consider other content that needs to be designed into a student’s day.

Question: We need direct communication from the District about PD for online learning. Our staff was not told that there was or even how to access the Ed Tech training today.

Answer: Please read the daily briefing going forward. All of this information will be included there. Additionally, many tips and resources for online learning are being shared via Schoology groups as ongoing supports for teachers and administrators. Here is a link to all of the available Schoology groups to consider joining and a Tech Tip to help you get started.

Question: How should I hold students accountable for their assignments during online learning when internet access is not an issue? At present I have assignments that have been completed by less than 30% of the students. Should we just accept what we get? What admin support will there be with families?

Answer: More specific guidance is forthcoming on grading practices for the rest of this year, but generally staff should assign and grade work in accordance with their professional judgement and existing school/district practices on grading just as they would for an in-person class.

Students failing to complete the assignments should be notified and their grades adjusted accordingly. Learning and accountability for tasks assigned is not on pause. If there is an internet or access issue, then we should problem solve with the student to get them access and afford them time and support to get caught up.